Mindfulness for Children

Children Together

mindfullyMAD.org

We need to teach our children how to think, not so much what to think. We need to teach children how to handle difficult thoughts, feelings and emotions as they arise. This would drastically reduce stress, anxiety and depression in later life, especially HSC time. It would also help reduce bullying and anti-social behaviour. At the same time, it would greatly increase creativity and productivity. Studies around the world clearly show that mindfulness in schools is making a huge difference. Academic performance up 15% – disciplinary instances including suspensions, detentions and bullying down by 63%. Follow this link to see what is happening worldwide.

We need your help to prepare a series of weekly mindfulness lessons for primary children. Our research is complete and we have enough material to make 36 lessons a reality (9 in each term). Each lesson will also have a note or email message to send home to encourage mindful practice with family and carers. Teachers & parents (especially home schoolers) will also benefit greatly by participating in the program.

Our goal will be fueled by your generosity. Please donate to help slow down the epidemic of depression, substance abuse and youth suicide in our communities. To show my gratitude, you will receive The Mindful Way PDF – 75 pages with 33 chapters. It teaches you what mindfulness is, what mindfulness is not and how to develop a mindful practice. It is written for older teens and above, I recommend reading one chapter per week and practice. Donate via PayPal:  https://goo.gl/H3f1Zf

If you are unable to help financially, perhaps you could share this blog. Please feel welcome to phone me on 0418 864 162 anytime for further information.

Thank You & Be Mindful! – John Shearer [Mindfulness Master & Founder of mindfullyMAD.org (mindfully Making A Difference)]

Mindful Teachers

DE Teacher

Mindfulness involves learning to direct attention to our experience as it is unfolding, moment by moment, with open-minded curiosity and acceptance. Interventions which teach mindfulness are proliferating in all sectors, including most recently in education for students and staff. It is a skill that can be learned quickly and developed with practice. Here are some of the benefits of mindfulness for school staff that is based on growing evidence:

  • Enhanced job performance, including better classroom management and organisation, greater ability to prioritise, to see the whole picture, to be more self-motivated and autonomous, to show greater attunement to students’ needs, and achieve more supportive relationships with them.
  • Reductions in stress and burnout, including a reduction in days off work and feelings of task and time pressure, improved ability to manage thoughts and behaviour, an increase in coping skills, motivation, planning and problem solving, and taking more time to relax.
  • Increased kindness and compassion to others, including greater empathy, tolerance, forgiveness and patience, and less anger and hostility.
  • Better mental health including less distress, negative emotion, depression and anxiety.
  • Better physical health, including lower blood pressure, declines in cortisol (a stress hormone) and fewer physical health problems.
  • Increased cognitive performance, including the ability to pay attention and focus, make decisions and respond flexibly to challenges.
  • Greater wellbeing, including life satisfaction, self-confidence, self-efficacy, self compassion and sense of personal growth.

There are many reasons why the development of mindfulness for teachers and school staff is a welcome move. Mindfulness has the capacity to improve staff occupational wellbeing and job satisfaction, improve performance, and reduce the wasted expenditure and human misery represented by the many days of stress related sickness and attrition from the teaching profession. The evidence base for the beneficial impact of mindfulness on the young is growing rapidly and students clearly need teachers skilled in mindfulness to teach it.

Mindfulness intervention is demonstrably more effective when taught by those who can understand from within what their students are learning, and model and embody the particular qualities that mindfulness develops, such as flexibility, attention, open minded curiosity, kindliness, empathy, compassion, acceptance, and patience, in their everyday interactions with children. These are skills and attitudes that underlie all effective engagement with young people: mindfulness for school staff clearly has a central role to play in educational improvement.

Johns Van1

Please feel welcome to contact me anytime for further information. Mindfully Yours with the next generation in focus.