Love Your Addictions by Dr Wayne Dyer

This excerpt is from Dr Wayne Dyer’s book Being in Balance.

Our proclivity toward addictive behaviours subsides measurably as we begin to practice reconnecting to our Source of being. Many books have been written on the subject of overcoming addictions. There are countless rehabilitation programs and centres to help those who are caught in the grip of drugs, alcohol, food, caffeine, sex, gambling, or something else that fits the description of chasing after what we don’t want.

I support any program designed to help people escape this imbalanced cycle that is such a destroyer of lives. My contribution here is a brief description of the key points I’ve found extremely useful in becoming an addiction-free person. The following five thoughts helped interrupt my out-of-balance thinking and behavior. Practiced with honesty and integrity, they can contribute to a new sense of empowerment and well-being that allows you to be free of unwanted addictions.

1. It’s All about Realignment

This is number one because when you really practice it, you never want to pursue what you don’t want at the expense of what you do want. You long to be in harmony, and you desire well-being. You came from well-being, so you simply need to choose thoughts that align with that foundation to find your way back into alignment.

Practice praying silently as a steady background whenever and wherever you can. Personalize and vary prayers such as this example derived from the St. Francis Prayer: Make me an instrument of thy well-being. See yourself always summoning the energy of well-being from your spiritual Source. Think like an animal who would never think of pursuing what it doesn’t want. Why don’t birds chase after butterflies? Because they’re poisonous. Ever heard of a robin in therapy trying to overcome its desire to eat butterflies? Silly, yes, but it’s a helpful image to hook onto.

So think like a human being with well-being. Eventually you’ll think like the Divine soul that you are, and you’ll be in vibrational harmony with the well-being that is your very nature.

2. Love Your Addictions

If it’s food, love it. If it’s cocaine, love it. If it’s painkillers, love them. If it’s cigarettes, love them. These are some of your greatest teachers. They’ve taught you through direct experience what it is that you no longer wish to be. They’ve taken you to the depths for some reason. This is an intelligent system you’re a part of. There are no accidents in a Universe supported by omniscience and omnipotence. Be grateful for these teachers.

If you hate them, curse them, and attempt to fight these addictions, you tip the balance toward hatred and fighting. You then continue to chase after what you don’t want because you’re in a weakened state. Fighting weakens; love empowers.

So tip the scale toward love. Be grateful for the addictions that have taught you so much. Send them a silent blessing. By doing so, you shift toward the love that you are.

3. Love Yourself

This is the natural outgrowth of choosing to love your addictions. Think of your body as a sacred temple, and extend reverence as a form of love. Be aware of, and grateful for, every organ, every drop of blood, every appendage, and every cell that constitutes your body. Start right this minute by offering a silent prayer of gratitude for your liver, your heart, and your brain. Just say: Thank you, God, for this glorious gift. I treasure it, and with your help, today I will begin the process of loving it unconditionally. If you still feel attracted to substances that you despise, say this silent prayer before ingesting them. Love will ultimately become the added weight that rebalances your life.

One of my favorite American poets, Henry W. Longfellow, tells us: “He that respects himself is safe from others; he wears a coat of mail that none can pierce.” When we truly respect and love ourselves, it’s as if we have a shield of flexible armor made of metal rings and loops of chain that protects us from the addictive otherthat’s been a part of our life.

4. Remove All Shame

You’ve done nothing wrong. You haven’t failed—you’ve only produced results. The question isn’t about how bad you’ve been; it’s about what you intend to do with the results you’ve produced. If you opt for shame and guilt, you choose the one emotional reaction that will disempower you more than any other. Whatever your present-moment status in relation to your addictions, it’s all perfect. You had to go through the traumas you went through. You had to disappoint the people you’ve mistreated. You had to get this far down. You needed this out-of-balance energy in order to aid you in generating the energy to get you to the higher place where you’re now headed.

You are still a Divine being in the eyes of God, despite any weaknesses that you feel are incongruous with God’s love. You needed all of those experiences, and now that you’re contemplating leaving them behind and rejoining your spiritual Source of well-being, shame will only hamper you and send you back to that absurdly imbalanced world where you never get enough of what you don’t want.

5. Live from a New Knowing

Finally, create a space within yourself, somewhere very private that only you and God are privy to. In this inner space, post the words I Know. This is your invisible connection to God, where purity and well-being define your new addiction-free self. Regardless of how many people distrust you and remind you of how many times in the past you’ve failed to live up to your promises, this is your space of knowing.

From this unshakable space, ask for Divine guidance. Ask to have the ecstatic energy of purity and well-being flow directly to your heart. If you slip, retreat immediately to this space of knowing. Forgive yourself and see yourself surrounded by God’s love, holding you in balance once again. As a man who has been there, I can promise you that you’ll be provided with all of the guidance, direction, and strength that you need—and you’ll get what you do want rather than what you do not want.

Note from John Shearer – Be Mindful… Pause… Connect! The power of mindfulness is in the pause. We connect with where we are in the present moment. We also connect with those around us with full presence, and most importantly, with our Source Energy. Thank you to the late Dr Wayne W Dyer!

How to Show Love and Respect to Yourself

Mindfulness is all about noticing and awareness. This is an excerpt from the late Dr Wayne Dyer’s book, 10 Secrets for Success and Inner Peace.
“By becoming more loving toward yourself, you will attract more of the higher, faster energies and begin to change what’s inside you. In your thoughts, cultivate an inner voice and attitude that’s 100 percent of the time for you. Imagine an aspect of yourself that only supports and loves you. You might schedule a certain time of the day when that’s the only thought that you allow yourself to pay attention to! Gradually this attitude will extend to other people even if you can only do it for a minute or two. You’ll begin to receive this energy back and ultimately be able to send thoughts of love and joy to everyone and everything in your world. Notice when your thoughts drift into the lower energy of ridicule or hate or guilt, and change the thought at that very moment if at all possible. If you’re unable to change the thought, then at least love yourself for what you did do… that is, for noticing.
Make a pact to remind yourself often of this secret of not being able to give away anything you don’t have. Then work on your personal program of self-love, self-respect, and self-empowerment, and create a huge inventory of what you wish to give away.
One of the lessons I continue to learn and practice is that the universe responds with the same energy that we send out. If you attract a lot of people who wish to take advantage of you, you need to consider what you’re doing to attract victimizers into your life. If you run into anger a lot, explore the angry thoughts you have inside you. If your consciousness is a “Gimme! Gimme! Gimme!” energy, you’ll attract all manner of demanding energies into your life. You know if this is true by the number of deadlines not being met, demanding bosses or customers you encounter, and the feeling of being a victim. Send out “Gimme! Gimme! Gimme!” energy to the universe, and it will do the same in return.
If what you give is self-respect and self-love, the universe, via the attractor energy, will return the love and respect you’ve been radiating. It’s really so simple. You can’t give away what you don’t have.”

Be Mindful… Pause… Connect! Yours in Awareness Always! – John

20 Lies We Tell Ourselves Daily

20 Lies We Tell Ourselves Daily

  1. “I have no choice.” One of the biggest lies is the belief that there are no options. Even people in terrible circumstances such as concentration camps, false imprisonment, and severe abuse have options in what they absorb, believe, and accept as truth.
  2. “I’ll never love again.” When a heart is broken, a person believes that they will never find love again. But love isn’t something you catch, it is something you give. The only limitation in loving is the one a person places on themselves.
  3. “I’ll never be good enough.” This is another lie that is rooted in trauma between the ages of two and five. Healing from this trauma and restating the reverse can resolve this lie.
  4. “That didn’t happen.” Denial is the most powerful defence mechanism because it can erase a traumatic moment as if it never happened. The problem is that whatever is denied becomes a haunting, magically appearing out of nowhere and causing destruction.
  5. “It wasn’t that bad.” Minimising difficult circumstances sounds good initially because there is some acknowledgement of the problem. However, dismissing intense feelings reinforces stuffing them which leads to explosions later.
  6. “It was the worst thing ever.” Making a mountain out of a mole hill is equally problematic. By increasing the size of an event, thought, or feeling, they can become larger than life.
  7. “I handled that well.” When the only counsel a person has is their own self, they tend to believe their version of what happened. Getting outside perspective and feedback from others improves self-awareness.
  8. “I’m worthless.” This particular statement is usually the result of some trauma between the ages of six and twelve. Unresolved pain can lead to a lifetime of suffering.
  9. “I’m the dumbest person.” This belief originated from someone else. It could be a parent, teacher, friend, student, or partner who repeated this until it was wrongly absorbed as truth.
  10. “No one can ever love me.” Hidden shame, grief, or guilt causes a person to believe that they are unlovable. Bringing the issue out in the open resolves this quickly.
  11. “Life isn’t worth living.” Every life has good and bad times, times of peace and war, and times of joy and sorrow. What makes the good, peaceful, and joyful times so wonderful is the contrast to the bad, warring, and sorrowful times.
  12. “I didn’t do anything wrong.” While a person’s actions might be correct, the thoughts behind it might not be. Self-awareness looks for ways to improve, not to escape responsibility.
  13. “It’s all my fault.” Accepting unnecessary responsibility for a trauma, event, or circumstance removes the accountability of others. This can be very damaging for their own growth and development.
  14. “I have no self-control.” This is used to diminish a person’s responsibility for behaviour that is problematic. Addicts frequently say this so they can justify their poor decisions.
  15. “It’s not my fault I reacted that way.” By casting blame on others for the poor reaction, a person falsely dismisses their responsibility while simultaneously holding others accountable.
  16. “I can’t help it.” As soon as a person says this, they have limited their choices to a few poor options. Just by saying the reverse, a person can open themselves up to more possibilities.
  17. “I have to have …” The sentence can be completed with a person, thing, money, or circumstance. Ironically, even when these items are obtained, there is a transfer to the next big item instead of finding satisfaction from within.
  18. “If only I had done …” The assumption of “if only” statements is that things could be different if they had responded another way. This is not always the case; sometimes the end result would still be the same regardless of the “if only”.
  19. “I’m not good at anything.” Being good at something requires effort. Talent will only take a person so far, the rest is all hard-work.
  20. “I have no purpose/passion/mission.” One of the lies of our society is that everyone needs to find their purpose/passion/mission in order to live life fully. A person can have a very full life while discovering their passion. Often this is not realised until a person is at the end of their career, not at the beginning.

Do any of these sound familiar? When these type of thoughts drop into your mind…
Be Mindful – This is the key thought we use to give our mind an instruction to…
Pause – We quieten our mind for a few seconds, as we do this, we…
Connect! – We connect with where we are using our five senses. We connect with who we’re with (with full presence). Most importantly, we connect with our Source Energy using our sixth sense or intuition.
If you are struggling with your thoughts, contact me to schedule a single one-on-one session. That’s all it takes to get your true mindful practice off to a flying start.
Mindfully Yours with Awareness Always! 🙏 John

True Essence of Mindfulness

This two minute clip by Jon Kabat-Zinn explains the true essence of mindfulness. The following snippet is from my mentoring service Mindful Insights:

True mind·ful·ness (2017) – A mental state achieved by focusing our awareness on the present moment, while calmly acknowledging our thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations, and surrounding environment. True mindfulness is characterised mainly by acceptance of our thoughts and feelings without judging whether they are right or wrong. True mindfulness focuses our mind on what is being sensed moment-by-moment, rather than ruminating on the past or the future. The ‘ful’ in mindfulness means being fully present.

My all time favourite definition is from 2009 when I trained to be an ACT Therapist with Dr Russ Harris [writer of The Happiness Trap (which I highly recommend)]:

“Mindfulness is a transformative mental state of awareness which involves focusing our attention with flexibility, openness, and curiosity.”

This simple definition tells us three important things:

  1. mindfulness is a process of awareness, not thinking. It involves paying attention to our experience in this moment as opposed to being caught up in thoughts. In a mindful state, we can let difficult thoughts and feelings freely flow through us, without getting all caught up in them or pushed around by them, and without getting into a struggle with them.
  2. mindfulness involves a particular attitude: one of openness and curiosity. Even if our experience in this moment is difficult, painful or unpleasant, we can be open to and curious about it instead of running from, fighting with or trying to avoid it. [eg: with alcohol or drugs (legal or illegal)]
  3. mindfulness involves flexibility of attention: the ability to consciously direct, broaden or focus attention on different aspects of experience. We can use mindfulness to ‘wake up,’ connect with ourselves and appreciate the fullness of each moment of life. We can use it to improve our self-knowledge – to learn more about how we feel, think and react. We can use it to connect deeply and intimately with the people we care about, including ourselves. And we can use it to consciously influence our own behaviour and increase our range of responses to the world we inhabit. It is the actions of living consciously – a profound way to enhance psychological resilience and increase life satisfaction.

Be Mindful… Pause… Connect! Yours in Awareness Always! – John

Benefits of a Mindful Practice

Feedback about the Benefits of a Mindful Practice

I have been receiving excellent feedback from people who have subscribed to my Mindful Insights Mentoring Service. My favourite comment, “It’s great having only one thing to work on each week.” Some of the benefits mentioned are:

  • “Helps me reduce stress.”
  • “Helps me to be in touch with my emotions, but not ruled by them.”
  • “Helps me to be more balanced.”
  • “Helps me live a better life and enjoy the life I have.”
  • “Starts my day off right.”
  • “I feel more creative.”
  • “Helps me to focus on what’s important.”
  • “I am less reactive.”
  • “Helps me sleep better.”
  • “Greater control over my life.”
  • “More peace.”
  • “Makes me feel better mentally and physically.”
  • “Helps me focus on the good things in life.”
  • “My decision making is clearer.”

Mindfulness is not a cure or quick fix. It is a process that requires practice, that’s why it is called a mindful practice. The hardest thing to do when I started my practice was remembering to practice! Several people have commented how they love receiving an insight every Friday. They read over the weekend and practice throughout their week.

I have retired as a mentor with Juvenile Justice to focus on establishing Mindfulness Mentoring Institute. I devote my mornings to teaching and coaching sessions and keep my afternoons appointment free to receive phone and skype calls. Please feel welcome to call for an obligation free chat about my certificate course or mentoring service. I am available 7 days between noon & 4pm NSW time. Phone 0418 864 162

My main message: Be Mindful… Pause… Connect!
Mindfully Yours with Love, Joy & Peace Always! – John

Mindfulness Day 2016

1Rocks FB

The first Sunday in May is Mindfulness Day. This year, it is 1st May! You may remember the first Mindfulness Day in 2014 when I created a facebook event and invited Australians with mental suffering. 4,700 people turned up and Mindfulness Day launched Mindful May. I wrote a blog every day in May and the event was truly amazing with hundreds of lives transformed. The event became my book Mindful Actions and thousands more lives have been turned around since. I am amazed by the feedback I receive, I especially love hearing from people coming off meds or waking up by way of their mindful practice. This year I have created another facebook event and will be sharing my story, my knowledge and my vision. Please join and be part of the mindful revolution by sharing this event. Go a step further and send me your photo to dress up. For more info, go to mindfullyMAD.org and click on Mindfulness Day.

How is your mindful practice coming along? I was asked by a magazine to write about developing a mindful practice, this is what I wrote:

Mindful practice is about silencing our minds with awareness and focusing on being fully present with what is happening. Having a mindful practice enables us to develop more awareness of our thoughts and feelings. We are able to notice and observe what is going on without getting all caught up, especially the unhelpful and negative stuff. A mindful practice also enables us to pause and create more silence and peace of mind throughout our day.

Mindfulness doesn’t stop the never-ending flow of mental chatter, nor does it stop the ebb and flow of our feelings. Sometimes we avoid practising mindfulness because we feel that something is going on deep down inside. It could be that we’re feeling anger, fear, sadness, past trauma, powerless, unmotivated or just tired. We know if we pause or stop we might have to deal with what is happening. Instead of stopping to acknowledge and feel what is coming to the surface, we distract ourselves by eating chocolate, drinking alcohol, taking drugs, focusing on our to-do list, watching TV, working too hard or many other distractions.

As we develop our mindful practice, we learn to recognise these unhelpful feelings for what they really are, just feelings. We learn that feelings aren’t facts and we make room for them or simply choose to let them go. A mindful practice helps us to connect fully with our whole being, mind, body, heart and soul. Then by deepening our practice of being present, the connection with ourselves deepens. We feel more connected to love, joy, peace, aliveness, strength and many other qualities. The flow on effect is the ability to deepen our presence with our loved ones and everyone we connect with in our daily lives.

The very essence of mindfulness is awareness in its purest form. With practice, mindful awareness becomes second nature, your home base and your refuge. With practice, your sense of awareness (or the silent observer as I like to call it) starts to abide more and more in your daily life. With practice, you will be able to readily step back and be the silent observer of your thoughts and feelings. Notice how I keep repeating ‘with practice’? Practice is the overall key to developing mindfulness and I cannot overstate it enough.

Use of the key thought ‘Be Mindful’ is a great way to trigger instant mindful awareness, no matter what is happening in any given moment. Use ‘Be Mindful’ to activate the silent observer of your thoughts and feelings without any judgement. When you activate the silent observer, you are also tuning in to your sixth sense or intuition. It is a sure way to tap into your creative genius. It is also a sure way to gain clarity of mind and a strong sense of priority. Be sure to pause and tune in at regular intervals to maintain your mindful practice.

Mindfully Yours with Love, Joy & Peace Always! – John

Mindfulness Masters

Elephant MM Logo1

What does it mean to be a mindfulness master? What are the qualities of a mindfulness master? Insightful, kind and loving come to mind but it’s hard to be sure unless we ourselves are masters. I started my mindful practice in 2009 and also started an intensive five year study into the many aspects of mindfulness. In 2014, I wrote a book called Mindful Actions and have witnessed many lives transformed through mindful practice. Here is a list of the most prominent qualities that mindfulness masters aspire to. Keep in mind that there are many stages to go through to become a master and everyone, both men and women alike, are somewhere on their path to mindfulness mastery.

  1. Loving, Kind and Empathic

Mindfulness masters are loving, kind and empathic. They genuinely care about other people, regardless of whether people care about them in return. Masters know that other people provide them with the spiritual nourishment needed to continue growing. They fully realise that everyone and everything is their teacher. Masters are so full of love that it has no choice but to overflow to all around them.

  1. Open-Minded and Insightful

Mindfulness masters are open-minded and insightful. They are able to see the world with clarity, without attachment to preconceived ideas about people, places and things. This enables them to observe the world without judgement or jumping to conclusions. Limiting beliefs are replaced with clarity of vision and understanding the bigger picture.

  1. Inner Strength

Mindfulness masters have great inner strength. They have learned intuitive ways of connecting with people and skillful ways of connecting with source energy within. Masters draw inner strength from our divine creator and understands their connection to life itself. They no longer have a need for the power struggles that most people engage in.

  1. Presence

Mindfulness masters are fully present with everyone they encounter. They have developed their own mindful practice and are very skilful in maintaining presence and awareness in all their relationships. Masters use all five physical senses and understand the concept of the silent observer or sixth sense. They trust in the intuitive process, not only from people but also from the energy that is connected to life itself. Masters realise that intuition speaks into the silence between their thoughts.

  1. Leadership

Mindfulness masters lead by example. Having awakened to the point of understanding the nature of suffering, they are committed to helping other people find freedom from suffering. They lead with love and cooperation, rather than fear and control. People follow them because of who they are and what they stand for. Masters value empathy and listening skills very highly as leadership traits.

  1. Happy

Mindfulness masters are happy and joyful. They have a cheerful disposition and are willing to share their joy with others. Masters understand that happiness isn’t the destination… happiness is the journey! They are always optimistic that challenges have a resolution. Masters are also very proficient at turning negatives into positives.

  1. Ordinary

Mindfulness masters are unpretentious. They know their place in the universe, and don’t need validation from others. Masters have nothing to prove to anyone, including themselves. They’re humble nature allows them to be kind and gentle, and be open to everyone they encounter.

  1. Patient and Understanding

Mindfulness masters are patient and understanding. They have learnt to be patient through their own journey. Masters understand that things happen when they are meant to and that the next step comes at the right time. They understand the challenges of creating a rich, full and meaningful life and never condemn people for their missteps or mistakes.

  1. Peaceful and Easygoing

Mindfulness masters are peaceful and easygoing. This is because they are free of fear and other unwholesome emotions. They know that the human condition reaches beyond physical existence, so they no longer have any fear of the unknown. Masters are free of worry because they understand that inner peace comes from within, and not from external happenings. They also have freedom from suffering because they know that inner peace does not depend on material possessions or abundance.

  1. Emotionally Stable

Mindfulness masters are emotionally stable because they no longer have an ego that needs validation. They don’t get angry because they are understanding and compassionate toward those who have not yet fully awakened. Masters understand that the actions of others are often not the actions of their authentic self but actions from their egoic nature.

  1. Mindful of Health

Mindfulness masters are mindful of their health… physical, mental and emotional. They know that the mind, body and spirit must be in harmony in order to maintain balance and vitality. Masters have developed an understanding of physical and mental health and do not depend on others for their wellbeing.

  1. Committed to Mindful Practice

Mindfulness masters never forget how they achieved mindful mastery. They are very aware that it takes continuous effort to maintain their mindful practice. Above all, masters are mindfully aware of themselves and the world around them. They are curious and always willing to learn from others. Masters can see with great clarity and understand the true nature of their existence. At the same time, they recognise that it takes time to observe, investigate and gain the knowledge necessary to achieve mindfulness mastery.

This is not a comprehensive list of the qualities of mindfulness masters but these are the most prominent. The purpose for highlighting these qualities is to give us a compass to guide us on our mindful journey… a vision of the path that lies ahead. It takes real effort and dedication but it is well worth it. Are you a mindfulness master? Please consider joining the team of mindfulness mentors at mindfullyMAD.org (mindfully Making A Difference) Need a little training to be a mindfulness mentor? Take a look at my certificate course.

Mindfully Yours with Love, Joy and Peace Always! – John

What Mindfulness is Not

 

 

 

Swan Lake

One thing is certain… mindfulness is not easy, but it is simple. It doesn’t come naturally, that is why it requires much practice. It’s not about relaxing. Mindfulness just means noticing what’s happening, including the things we find difficult. It doesn’t involve listening to panpipes to escape your worries. It isn’t a meditation practice. Mindfulness is a practice for the whole of life. It’s about finding a different way to respond to experience throughout your day.

It isn’t about emptying your mind. Minds produce thoughts, it’s what they’re built for, and your mind keeps on producing them even if you do happen to be meditating. You can become calm and settled by learning to accept your thoughts, making room for them or letting them go. It is always good to remind yourself that thoughts are just that… thoughts. No need to dwell on them, fight with them, act on them or try to avoid them.

It isn’t Buddhist. It is true that mindfulness has it’s roots in the age of Buddha but no-one owns mindfulness. Mindfulness has evolved and has now become the merging of ancient eastern philosophy and the latest western psychology. The beauty of mindfulness is that it is not a religion at all. However, all religions could greatly benefit from having a mindful practice.

It isn’t a technique. Mindfulness isn’t something you do. It’s a way of being. It isn’t a way to fix our problems. Mindfulness can help eliminate depression, anxiety, stress or chronic pain, but not by fixing them. We learn to relate in a new way to the things that trouble us, rather than trying to make them go away. Having a mindful practice is about re-training our minds so that we can cope with whatever comes our way.

It isn’t about doing things slowly. Some mindfulness courses include things like eating a raisin slowly. That does help you to notice details that you may otherwise miss. It also highlights the fact that we often rush or go through the motions while thinking about other things. But that doesn’t mean that you should do everything slowly. A mindful practice is about doing things on purpose, even if they are sometimes at a fast pace.

It isn’t scientific. Research into the effects of mindfulness and its impact on the mind and body are impressive. It is helping to bring mindfulness into the mainstream. Science can measure what mindfulness does, but it can’t measure what it is. Measuring mindfulness is a science; practising it is an art that requires presence, awareness, connection and living in the moment.

It isn’t a fad. Mindfulness is certainly becoming popular, but is it a fad? Our communities are becoming more distracted than ever before. Mindlessness is rampant and there is a growing epidemic of mental suffering. Modern culture seems to be focused on wanting more, getting more and having more. Mindfulness is about being grateful in the moment and is here to stay!

This is from my certificate course Keys to Mindfulness Mentoring. Check it out, especially if you want to make a difference in young peoples lives. Mindfully Yours with Love, Joy and Peace Always! – John Shearer

Mindful Connection

Star Fish

We are All One, One with Spirit, One with Life!

Mindful connection is the goal of developing a mindful practice. Mindful connection with your loved ones, your friends and co-workers. Mindful connection with your authentic higher self which is part of universal spiritual energy. Mindful connection with life in all its diversity. A mindful practice is a process that brings about realisation of your true oneness with all that is.

Be Mindful is the key thought that helps in the transformational process. Be Mindful is the main theme in my book Mindful Actions and I teach it to all my clients. Be Mindful is the basis for every guided meditation that I conduct, whether in a group or in one-on-one sessions.

Being mindful is the ongoing practice of pausing your mind chatter and focusing your attention on the present moment with awareness. Anytime you find yourself in a stressful situation or under pressure, let Be Mindful be the trigger to take you to a place of peaceful presence or of heightened awareness. Use Be Mindful whenever you have an unhelpful thought or feeling, to shift focus to your values or purpose.

Use Be Mindful as a powerful trigger to pause and connect to your inner wisdom. Use Be Mindful as a magical trigger to silence your mind to enhance creativity and innovation. Use Be Mindful as a loving trigger that brings about full presence of mind, resulting in heightened intuition and intimacy in your relationships.

Mindfully Yours with Love, Joy & Peace Always! – John Shearer

Beliefs

1Bamboo Stone1

1982-1997 ~ I believed that I had an imbalance of chemicals in my brain. I believed I was mentally ill and would never be cured. I believed that I would have to take medications for the rest of my life. Professional people told me these things. People who had studied and been trained for many years in Universities.

1997-2009 ~ I had a spiritual awakening and believed in the power of Spirit. No more depression and no more meds. I believed the mind was like the moon. The moon has a light side as well as a dark side. For the first time in my life, everything made sense to me. All through history I could see the evidence of this spiritual game of chess. Love, joy and peace on one side versus hate, sadness and war on the other. Minds consumed by the light, dreaming, creating and full of life versus minds consumed by the darkside, nightmarish, destroying and suicidal.

2009-2013 ~ I started the study and practice of mindfulness. I felt driven and spent countless hours in front of the computer. 20-30 hours per week, it almost drove my wife insane. Mindfulness is all about awareness and being fully connected to spirit. It is the tool we all need to live a life of peace and happiness.

2013-End of Days ~ Osho said, “It’s not a question of learning much – on the contrary. It’s a question of unlearning much.” We all have beliefs based on what we have learned and what we have experienced. This in turn becomes our truth and we all have different truths.

The mind is like a computer and needs to be reset now and then. I decided to un-believe everything I had learned on my life’s journey. As thoughts came to mind, I used my silent observer (my heart) to test for truth. The results have been absolutely enlightening! This is your mindful action. Be warned; your mind is going to object strongly, just remember, you are not your mind!

Here are a few random thoughts:

  • What you believe has more power than what you dream or wish or hope for.
  • You become what you believe.
  • Don’t believe everything you think.
  • The reason you do the things you do is because you think the things you think.
  • The reason you think the things you think is because you believe the things you believe.
  • The root cause of your problems is not what you are doing – it is what you are thinking!
  • The worst thing you can do is believe that you don’t have a choice.
  • Life presents you with endless choices and opportunities if you care to step out and face your fears without limiting beliefs.
  • Only you can take the impossible and make it possible!

Be Mindful – and Open to All Possibilities! Love, Joy & Peace Always! – John